Monitoring im Wald
  • research and implementation projects
  • educational and volunteer activities
  • variety of species are found in the Wienerwald
All nodes from "Environmental sustainability"
Abgebrochener Baum

Deadwood succession – Life in Deadwood

In the course of this Wienerwald BR project, in Co operation with Forstamt und Landwirtschaftsbetrieb der Stadt Wien (MA 49) and ÖBf AG, the wood is sampled several times a year over an observation period of 10 years, trapping, collecting and identifying beetles and fungi respectively.

Read moreabout: Deadwood succession – Life in Deadwood
Braunerde

Soil monitoring

A number of questions were explored in connection with the project: e.g. which properties are linked with which soil types, what are the changes in availability of water to plants, and how good is the nutrient supply in various locations?

Read moreabout: Soil monitoring
Naturwaldzellen im Wienerwald

Patches of natural forest

In conjunction with this project, spiders and ground beetles were explored in natural forest patches in the Irenental.

Read moreabout: Patches of natural forest
Totholzversuch

BIOS – Regeneration and Deadwood Dynamics in Beech- and Oakwoods

The initiation of natural regeneration is one of the most important but also most difficult tasks in the management of semi-natural forests. The extent of benefit from light absorption has a major impact on the regenerative success of beechwoods and oakwoods.

Read moreabout: BIOS – Regeneration and Deadwood Dynamics in Beech- and Oakwoods
Wildschwein

Sustainable wildlife management:

In conjunction with the project entitled ’Integrative, sustainable wildlife management in the Wienerwald BR’, criteria and corresponding indicators were developed for the sustainable management of wildlife and their habitats.

Read moreabout: Sustainable wildlife management:
Blich in den Himmel

Safeguarding and monitoring biodiversity in the core zones of Vienna and Lower Austria

In line with the goals laid down by UNESCO, the core zones of the Wienerwald BR are designated to conserve biological diversity, to monitor ecosystems exposed to anthropogenic disturbance and to implement research projects. Through conservation by non-intervention in natural processes, it is hoped that these areas will become the ‘virgin forests of tomorrow’.

Read moreabout: Safeguarding and monitoring biodiversity in the core zones of Vienna and Lower Austria
Krötenpaar im Teich

Amphibians

All 20 native species of amphibians in Austria are on the Red List of Endangered Species for Austria and are strictly protected.

Read moreabout: Amphibians
Goldrute

Neobiota (non-indigenous species) in the Wienerwald BR

Invasive species such as Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica ) are on the advance in the Wienerwald. Owing to their dominance and rapid spread, the diversity of plant species and thus the resilience of native ecosystems is reduced.

Read moreabout: Neobiota (non-indigenous species) in the Wienerwald BR